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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
and its impact on neighboring countries. then, a look at foreign policy challenges facing the obama administration. after that, a discussion about the state of women's rights around the world. >> if you have some hotshot who just got his phd in computer science from stanford, she is getting offers from all over the world. to say you can stay in some limbo for six years, that is not really competitive. >> congress can do a lot. you do not have to be efficient on your iphone or blackberry to understand the application of policy and what makes it work and does not. >> it is very difficult to make investment decisions and expect any kind of return on investment when you have no way to predict the future. our difficulty right now is that there is no consistency or certainty in in our policy decisions. >> the government's role in technology and policy, from this years ces international consumer electronics show. monday night on the communicators on c-span2. >> at age 65, she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president. she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjami
a genuine common foreign policy, to have a genuine european defense. france is ready. it's time to put an end to splitting up our resources and bring them together, bring our industries together as well. harmonize our position in international bodies where europe should speak with a single voice, to act in order to sort out conflicts which undermine confidence in humanity. think about syria. i'm thinking about iran, to push forward negotiations between israelis and palestinians because the time has come for that as well. europe can't just wait for the u.s.a. it needs to be present itself. to make those discussions start up again. [applause] [speaking french] >> translator: europe also has a role to play when it comes to questions of our climate. france is ready to organize the 2015 climate conference. but we can't act alone. europe needs to set an example when it comes to renewable energies and energy efficiency. i believe in europe. because i think that europe is useful and good, not just for europeans, but for the whole planet. and the best way for europe to protect its own interests
to president obama's foreign policy in as far as being able to take out terrorist where is he doesn't have to send u.s. troops and john brennan was an architect of that strategy. of course, controversial because there are innocent civilians who can get caught up in that as "the new york times" written about earlier this week, as well. that's obviously where some of this is coming from but the question americans face is would you rather have american troops and boots on the ground in yemen and pakistan or the unmanned drones taking on this responsibility? >> thank you very much. i appreciate you changing conversations in the middle of everything. we'll have plenty of time i'm sure to talk about chuck hagel. meantime, let's take the audience to the senate hearing and senator dianne feinstein. >> because of the added importance of having steady leadership at an organization that conducts most of its business outside of the public arena. intelligence is critical to the successful draw down in afghanistan, to the brutal war going on within's syria's borders, across north africa where the attack
further reference as well. hosting where the debate is doctor bucci, director of our center for foreign policy studies. he previously served heritage a senior research fellow for defense and homeland security. is well-versed in the special area operations and cybersecurity areas as well as defense support to civil authorities. he served for three decades as an army special forces officer in july 2001 coming assume the duties of military assistance to secretary rumsfeld and worked daily with the secretary for the next five and a half years, and then upon retirement from the army continued at the pentagon is deputy assistant secretary of defense, homeland defense, and america security affairs but please join me in welcoming steve bucci. [applause] >> let me add my welcome to all of you. i think you're going to have a real treat this morning, as john mentioned him on a special forces officer by profession, and so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do. they don't let me do it anymore. i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact, and that when
hope you all look at the article written january 17 in "foreign policy" magazine about aegis and the problems that have surfaced about them. now i have talked to patrick kennedy about this and his staff has come over and briefed my staff that they believe aegis is doing just fine. . >> i won't go into the i.g. report on the background checks. but the people that are at kabul now, it is $100 million a year we are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their
't correspond to the u.s. economy. they almost need a more specific policy aimed at foreign exchange. >> what do you mean? >> who actually has a -- normally it's run by government. >> well, you could say that. that is who has foreign exchange policies. maybe the snb. they would have more big exchange rate policy when it comes -- it's basically depends on the country. but it would to me suggest that he would like to see that. >> i don't think he would argue for a stronger euro, certainly. >> but it's not necessarily the overall value. it's what does the french economy tend to be -- >> exactly. he's implying a stronger euro. there's a lot of talking out of both sides of the mouth here. we'll see what else he has to say. there's going to be many more visionary comments about the future. >> politicians speaks out both sides at the same time. >> this is the parliamentary commission on the banking standards. we'll keep our eye owes that, as well. >> yeah. haven't seen too much out of that hearing yet, but you are looking at a live feed there. >> stim around. we're going to take a quick break. swiss ba
that you look up the article that was written on gentry 17th in the foreign policy magazine about egis at the kabul industry and the problems that have already surfaced about them. now i have talked to patrick kennedy about this and his staff has come over and briefed by staff that they believe it is doing just fine. the end of this i have to tell you the umbrella contract for the high level security in the sea is a 10 billion-dollar contract over five years and i won't go into the report of the background check but it's $100 -- $100 million a year. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. somebody has got to do cost-benefit analysis. all that i told you. can you imagine in the money that we spent fooling around with these contractors the were not getting the job done can you imagine the time we spend and the money that has been spent? i would like for you to talk about the cost benefits of putting marines on the embassy's when we are in contingencies and why this is so hard to get our arms around and how are we saving any money? >> welcome a senator, just to react
. this is the greatest threat because we failed to pass the legislation ourselves. we can't stop at foreign policies where we can divert, identify an attack. i want to get of to the job of the c.i.a. i'm going to be blunt and that is no surprise to you, sir. i've been with the committee for more than 10 years. with the exception of mr. panetta i feel like i've been jerked around by every c.i.a. director. i had to pull information out, and i feel like i've been misdirected. they had to tell us that we had weapons of mass destruction in iraq. we know the problems we've had before and the chair has spoken about it all the way. quite frankly those questions were evaded, distorted, etc. my question to you is, knowing your background, knowing your education, can i have your word that you're going to be very forthcoming with this committee to speak truth to power, to speak truth about power?and even when it is uncomfortable? >> truthfulness was a value that was put into me in my home in new jersey. it still is to this day. honesty is the best policy. none of us are perfect human beings. i will say i will b
and advise the senior most policy makers about government about a foreign, political, and economic developments, or an operations officer, whose job it is to find and obtain those elusive secrets to provide advance warning and strategic surprise, impending violence, cyber attacks and a persistent threats such as nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons proliferation, or a technical expert, who finds nuggets of intelligence in tremendous volumes of data, provides secure data collection and systems and encountered the latest threats to our nation, or a support officer whose responsibility is to provide analysis and when directed by the president, conducting covert action and carried out with the provision speed, skill, and efficiency. and from sub-saharan africa to central and south america to the vast expanses of asia and the great cities of europe and all countries in between, cia officers were there, sometimes in force and sometimes virtually standing alone. and for those 25 years, it was a great honor for me to be a cia officer, as i knew that this country's contributions to sec
's foreign policy saying what has transpired in mali is not a consequence of what transpired in libya, i think that analysis is mistaken. secondly, as part of point one, we need as analysts to recognize to that there is an emerging arc of instability that begins in libya, arcs down through mali, as to this moment avoided it substantially, and also embraces northern nigh nigeria so examining this question, i think needs to be understood from a regional perspective rather than a national perspective. the second point that i would like to discuss are the emerging resistance groups within mali, and how they are similar and how they are different. not only in terms of their political objectives, but also in terms of the ethnic divisions that exist among these three different groups. more specifically aqim, and in understanding these ethic and political differences that will provide us with an opportunity to understand not only how they are different but also from a diplomatic perspective there are opportunities to create among the groups. the third point i would like to address is the arrange
is putting the united states at greater risk. for all of the obama administration's foreign policy successes, from ending the war in iraq to killing osama bin laden, the most enduring policy legacy of the past four years may well turn out to be an approach to counterterrorism that american officials call the yemen model. a mixture of drone strikes and special forces raids targeting al qaeda leaders. mr. brennan is the president's chief counterterrorism advisor and architect of this model. in a recent speech he claimed there was, quote, little evidence that these actions are generating widespread anti-american sentiment or recruits for aqap, unquote, referring to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. perhaps the initial donea bye instead of aqap, this is me talking, not the article, instead of the initials, acronyms that the administration s, government likes to do, maybe it ought to be mbch, the muslim brotherhood on capitol hill. where al lackey that this administration killed with a drone strike led prayers. back to the article, mr. brennan's assertion was either shockingly naive or deliberat
need to be calm and collected a lonely job of the strategy to have a genuine common foreign -- when we draw up the strategy to have a genuine common for policy. it is time to put an end to splitting up our resources and bring them together. there are conflicts which undermine confidence in humanity. it stopped nuclear proliferation to put forward negotiations. the time has come for that as well. it needs to be present. " europe has a role to play when it comes to be clients. we cannot act alone. your knees to set an example when it comes to energy of -- europe me to set an example when it comes to energy efficiencies. i believe europe is useful and good not just for europeans before the whole planet. the best way for europe to protect its own it interest is to protect its values are of the world. we need to come back to what the project is all about. it is a political project based on values and the knowledge, ideas, works of art, culture comic creativity. it is constantly reminding ourselves that we can be able to be up to the level of our past and maybe help on new generations to com
to take incomplete and contradictory information and advise the senior most policy makers about government about a foreign, political, and economic developments, or an operations officer, whose job it is to find and obtain those elusive secrets to provide advance warning and strategic surprise, impending violence, cyber attacks and a persistent threats such as nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons proliferation, or a technical expert, who finds nuggets of intelligence in tremendous volumes of data, provides secure data collection and systems and encountered the latest threats to our nation, or a support officer whose responsibility is to provide analysis and when directed by the president, conducting covert action and carried out with the provision speed, skill, and efficiency. and from sub-saharan africa to central and south america to the vast expanses of asia and the great cities of europe and all countries in between, cia officers were there, sometimes in force and sometimes virtually standing alone. and for those 25 years, it was a great honor for me to be a cia officer, as i knew
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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